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Posted 2017-05-23 10:14:01 - by Hà Trung Thành
Manchester attackImage copyright PA

Exam boards are telling schools that they can re-arrange GCSE and A-level exams, in the wake of the Manchester attack.

A joint statement from the exam boards says that it will be up to schools to decide whether exams should go ahead.

The exam boards say no students will be "disadvantaged".

"Schools and colleges affected by the bombing should contact the relevant exam boards. Students affected should speak to their teachers.‎"

Hundreds of thousands of teenagers are taking exams this week - and young people are believed to be among the victims of the Manchester attack.

The exam boards are not postponing any GCSEs or A-levels, but they are giving schools discretion over whether their pupils take them.

"Our thoughts go out to everyone affected by last night's terrible incident in Manchester," says a statement from the Joint Council for Qualifications.

"GCSE and A-level examinations ‎are taking place today across the UK but, understandably, some students, schools and colleges will have been affected by the bombing.

"School leaders are best placed to decide if exams should go ahead and, if they decide they are not, exam boards will make sure that no student is disadvantaged.

"Schools and colleges affected by the bombing should contact the relevant exam boards. Students affected should speak to their teachers.‎"

The Joint Council for Qualifications says awarding bodies will look at such decisions on a "case-by-case basis and will ensure that there is fairness across the system".

"There will be some flexibility on start times given the transport difficulties in Manchester."

But there will also be questions about the security of an exam if it is rescheduled - and there are separate "special considerations arrangements" in such circumstances.

These would be the type of arrangements for students facing unexpected problems who are unable to attend an exam - such as being injured or suffering a bereavement.

They might either take a unit

"The most important thing is that centres contact their awarding bodies and students contact their teachers for guidance," says the JCQ.

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